Truefire - Tom Dempsey's 30 Jazz Progressions You MUST Know

Added 6 months ago
Title: Truefire - Tom Dempsey's 30 Jazz Progressions You MUST Know
Category: Learning
Size: 1.21 GB
Added: April 16, 2020, 12:00 pm
Description
It's imperative for jazz guitarists to understand how chord progressions function in a song. In doing so, you are able to unlock the harmonic code which allows you to have the freedom to express yourself as both an accompanist and as a soloist. As your study deepens, you begin to realize that there are common progressions that are found all throughout the jazz canon.

In 30 Jazz Progressions You MUST Know, Tom Dempsey will show you how to play fundamental elements and jazz standard song forms to help you take your jazz playing to the next level.

"Throughout this collection of thirty jazz progressions, well explore foundational elements like two fives and two five ones, all the way to 32 bar jazz standard song forms to transcend your jazz performance skills to a new higher level. Well look at essential progressions like major and minor one six two fives and harmonic options like tritone substitutions and secondary dominants. Well explore Jazz blues and minor blues progressions, bebop blues in the style of Charlie Parker, modal progressions like those used in tunes like Impressions and Maiden Voyage. And finally, well cover chord progressions found in hundreds of jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Sweet Georgia Brown, and Ive Got Rhythm."

Tom will explain and demonstrate all of the key concepts and approaches along the way. Youll get standard notation and tabs for all of the performance studies. Plus, youll be able to use TrueFires learning tools to sync the tab and notation to the video lesson. You can also loop or slow down the videos so that you can work with the lessons at your own pace. All of the backing tracks are included to work with on your own as well.

Grab your guitar and let's get jazzed with Tom Dempsey!

Straight Ahead Two Five - Jazz Progression 1
""Straight Ahead Two Five" is just as the title says. This lesson will introduce you the foundation of a II-V progression in a major key. Here I will show you two different ways to play a II-V progression in the key of C major. I'll also explain what the II-V is and how it relates to diatonic harmony. Having a good understanding of II-V progressions is very important irmation to know and to be able to play."

Tritone Two Five - Jazz Progression 2
"In "Tritone Two Five" I introduce the concept of a tritone substitution to a II-V progression. I show you how the theory works and how to apply it to the progression. You will also learn two different versions of a II-V progression using a tritone substitution. "

Classic Two Five One - Jazz Progression 3
"This lesson, "Classic Two Five One," is an introduction to a II-V-I progression in a major key. Here I show you two different ways to play a II-V-I progression in the key of C major. Having a firm understanding of the II-V-I progression and having a couple of good sets of voicings under your fingers will help you to sound like a jazz guitar player instantly. "

Tritone Two Five One - Jazz Progression 4
"Progression number four, "Tritone Two Five One," takes a look at how we use a tritone substitution with a II-V-I progression. This is a very common progression that you will encounter and bring in to your own jazz performances. Here you will learn two different ways to bring in the substitution. "

One Six Two Five Foundation - Jazz Progression 5
"In "One Six Two Five Foundations" we will take a look at another very important progression in jazz which is our I-vi-ii-V progression in a major key. This progression is found in a number of different tunes including rhythm changes and is a very important one to become familiar with. Here I will show you two different ways of approaching this progression in an effort to add these progressions to your repertoire. "

Bring on Secondary Dominant - Jazz Progression 6
"This next progression we are going to call "Bring On The Secondary Dominant." It's a I-vi-ii-V progression in C major where we'll substitute A7 for the diatonic vi chord of Amin7. In this lesson I'll show you how secondary dominants work and I'll show you two different ways of applying this substitution to the progression. "

Essential Minor Two Five - Jazz Progression 7
"Here in progression number 7 I like to call this the "Essential Minor Two Five." Learning the minor ii-V progressions is a little bit different then learning the major ii-V. These progressions are an essential part of jazz as well. I'll show you two different ways of approaching this progression and give you the theory behind them. "

Tritone, Meet Minor Two Five - Jazz Progression 8
"Progression number eight I call "Tritone Meets the Minor Two Five." Here we're taking our regular ii-V in a minor key and interjecting the tritone substitution on the V chord. I'll show you two different ways of approaching the application of this substitution to the progression. "

Minor Two Five Resolution - Jazz Progression 9
"Progression number nine we call "Minor Two Five Resolutions." This is the minor ii-V resolving to the i chord which in this case is Cmin7. I'll show you two different ways of playing this progression during the lesson. "

"Tri" this Two Five One - Jazz Progression 10
"Progression number ten I call "Tri This Two Five One." Here I show you a ii-V-i in a minor key but we are going to bring in the tritone. Specifically the tritone substitution. I'll show you how to utilize this substitution two different ways which can be an effective addition to your repertoire of progressions. "

Minor One Six Two Five - Jazz Progression 11
"Progression number eleven we call "Minor One Six Two Five" because that's what it is. It's a i-vi-ii-V progression that's played in a minor key. In this case it's the key of C minor. I'll show you two different ways to approach playing this chord progression. "

Two-Chord Tritone Sub - Jazz Progression 12
"Progression number twelve is called "Two Chord Tritone Sub." Here we're going to put a tritone substitution on the ii chord of a i-vi-ii-V progression in a minor key. I'll show you the theory behind this substitution as well as two different ways of playing the progression. "

Charleston Blue - Jazz Progression 13
"Progression number thirteen we're going to call "Charleston Blue." This is your standard jazz blues progression. It's found in so many tunes in the jazz repertoire. I'll explain the theory behind it and give you a good set of chord voicings to use when playing this progression. "

Quick 4 the Blues - Jazz Progression 14
"Progression fourteen is going to be called "Quick 4 The Blues." Here we're going to bring in the quick IV chord along with a diminished chord. I'll explain how this works and give you some good voicings to use when playing this progression. "

Dressin' Up the Blues - Jazz Progression 15
"Progression number fifteen we're going to call "Dressin' Up The Blues." This progression is a reharmonization of the blues. We're bringing in a lot more harmony and really dressing it up! I'll explain the theory behind this reharmonization and show you some great voicings to use when playing this type of progression. "

Charleston Mirror Minor Blues - Jazz Progression 16
"Progression number sixteen we're going to call "Charleston Mirror Minor Blues." Here you are going to learn how to use the Charleston rhythm, two different versions of it, over a standard minor blues progression. I'll give you the theory behind it and a good set of changes to use when playing a minor blues. "

Quick 4 Minor Blues - Jazz Progression 17
"Progression number seventeen we're going to call "Quick 4 Minor Blues" because that's what it is. This is a minor blues progression with the addition of a quick movement to the IV chord. I'll explain the theory behind it and show you a good set of chord voicings to use when playing this progression. "

Minor Enhancements - Jazz Progression 18
"Progression eighteen we are going to call "Minor Enhancements." It's actually quite a lot of enhancements. We're going to take the minor blues progression and we're going to enhance it with some other harmonic possibilities. I'll review the theory behind it and share some important chord voicings to include in your toolbox of jazz harmony. "

Modal Impressions - Jazz Progression 19
"Progression number nineteen we're going to call "Modal Impressions." This is what we call a modal progression that is based on two very famous jazz standards. One is "Impressions" and the other is "So What." Both are based on the dorian mode. I'll explain the theory behind the progression as well as giving you some important chord voicings to use when playing this type of music. "

Modal Voyage - Jazz Progression 20
"Progression number twenty we're going to call "Modal Voyage." This is based on the progression for the Herbie Hancock classic "Maiden Voyage." I'll show you the voicings and the theory behind the progression. "

Bebop Blues - Jazz Progression 21
"Progression twenty-one we are going to call "Bebop Blues." This is a blues progression that was essentially invented by Charlie Parker and many of the bebop musicians of the era. We're taking a blues progression and enhancing it harmonically. I'll explain the theory behind it and give you some important chord voicings to integrate into playing this type of progression. "

Bird's Chromatic Blues - Jazz Progression 22
"Progression twenty-two we're going to call "Bird's Chromatic Blues." This is another bebop blues, a bird inspired blues progression. But there's a lot of chromatic movement happening throughout. I'll explain the theory behind this progression and give you some good chord voicing to use when playing this progression. "

Georgia Sweet - Jazz Progression 23
"Progression twenty-three we call "Georgia Sweet." This is a chord progression based on the chords to "Sweet Georgia Brown," a jazz classic. I'll explain the theory behind the tune and give you a good set of changes to use when playing this progression. "

I've Got a Jazz Progression - Jazz Progression 24
"Progression number twenty-four is "I've Got a Jazz Progression." And I do. It's called rhythm changes. This is based on the Gershwin song "I've Got Rhythm." It's an AABA song form. This progression is the foundation for so many songs in the jazz canon. Here I will show you a good set of changes along with the theory behind it. "

Pass the Diminished - Jazz Progression 25
"Progression number twenty-five is known as "Pass the Diminished." Here we're going to use passing diminished chords in a rhythm changes progression. This helps to create nice chromatic movement between the chords. I will explain the theory behind these changes and give you a good set of voicings to practice. "

Rhythm Changes Reharmonized - Jazz Progression 26
"Progression twenty-six is "Rhythm Changes Reharmonized." This is a common reharmonization of rhythm changes that is actually brought to fruition by the great saxophonist Sonny Stitt with his song "Eternal Triangle." I'll explain the theory behind this reharmonization and give you a good set of voicings to use when playing this progression. "

Get On Board - Jazz Progression 27
"Progression twenty-seven is "Get On Board." We're talking about getting on board the A train. "Take The A Train" is a very important jazz tune for you to learn. It is an AABA tune which has a lot of similar elements that we saw in previous lessons. I'll explain the theory behind the progression and give you some good voicings to play. "

Fall Changes - Jazz Progression 28
"Progression twenty-eight is known as "Fall Changes." Here we have the chord changes to the classic standard "Autumn Leaves." This is an AAB tune which moves between a major key and its' relative minor. I'll explain the theory related to this tune and give you a good set of chord voicings to play with the progression. "

Bossa Blues - Jazz Progression 29
"Progression number twenty-nine is going to be known as "Bossa Blues." This is based on the Kenny Dorham tune "Blue Bossa." This is a very important jazz tune for you to know. I'll give you a harmonic analysis of the tune and show you a good set of voicings to use when playing the song. "

Get Your Changes in Tune - Jazz Progression 30
"Progression thirty is known as "Get Your Changes In Tune." This is based on the Miles Davis classic "Tune Up." The tune itself is a series of ii-V-I progressions in three different keys. I'll explain the theory behind the progression and give you a good set of chord voicings to play with this tune. "

https://truefire.com/jazz-guitar-lessons/30-progres...-must-know/c1501
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